SEO Copy Manager Richard Hostler talks in-house SEO copywriting

SEO Copy Manager Richard Hostler answers in-house SEO copywriting questions.Brookstone SEO Copy Manager and Ironman (he completed the triathlon in July), Richard Hostler takes time out of his work, and workout, schedule to answer our in-house SEO copywriting questions.

Brookstone has such a great “voice” for product descriptions. How was this style developed, and what do you recommend to other in-house copy teams who are trying to determine their company voice?

We’ve come a long way from our early days of selling specialty tools via mail order. Back then, it was much simpler to communicate with customers in a single voice. As our product lines and business evolved, so too did our voice. Now we interact with customers across the country through our stores, catalogs, and email programs, and around the world via our website. Maintaining a single voice across all these channels can be tricky. We strive to keep all our copy informative and engaging, but most of all, fun. After all, we sell fun stuff. Our copy should reflect that.

Brookstone does SEO copywriting right. Do you have a formula down for creating your site content or tips for other copywriters to improve their style and technique?

One point I like to emphasize whenever I talk about SEO copywriting is that it has to be good copywriting first and foremost. Sure, you have to choose the right keywords and employ best practices in your site architecture, but that’s just loading the bases. If you want to score points with your customers or clients, you have to write interesting, informative and engaging content.

Since you aren’t the only one writing the copy, how do you convey the Brookstone style to your writers?

I encourage all writers to keep it simple. Advertising copywriters and SEO copywriters often overthink and overwrite their copy. Our writers need to find whatever is fun and unique about the product at hand and write around that. We have to get to the point quickly to catch the eyes of shoppers who are browsing online, but also tell an engaging enough story to keep the interest of customers who read all the way to the end. Once new writers understand how to keep their copy fun while writing short and long at the same time, they’ve pretty much got the Brookstone style.

What do you look for when hiring an SEO copywriter?

I look for three things. First, I look for a strong writer. This is by far the most critical trait. SEO is something that can be taught. Good writing isn’t. Second, I look for someone who understands the dual nature of SEO copywriting. We are writing for both the spiders and our human readers. Some people get tripped up here and have trouble communicating with both audiences fluently. Finally, I look for someone who really wants the position. I have interviewed dozens of writers over the years who haven’t researched me, my company or our products. If they won’t take the time to prepare for an interview, I have to question whether or not they will put in the research time necessary to be an effective SEO copywriter.

What advice do you have for writers (SEO or otherwise) looking for an in-house copywriting gig?

If a company has an in-house writing team, it will also have plenty of copy for you to check out. Whether this is print ads, catalogs, articles, retail signage, instruction manuals, technical pieces, emails, or any kind of web content, you can use it for two important purposes. First, you can decide if the company’s product set and/or style are a good fit for you. It’s very difficult to write engaging copy day in and day out about something that doesn’t interest you. Second, and this goes back to my answer to the last question, you can use the published copy to better prepare for your interview.

So, you asked me this question during my Brookstone interview. Now, here it is back atcha! What ís the best writing advice you’ve ever received?

Don’t take others’ criticism and editing personally. I had real trouble with this when I was getting started in my writing career. I would pour myself into a piece of ad copy or spend days on an article only to have it torn apart by someone higher up the food chain. It’s hard not to take that kind of beatdown personally, but that’s exactly what you have to do. Clients and in-house partners are often unclear when giving instructions for a project. I find that it requires a completed first draft before clear direction is given. Accept the perspective and criticism of others and don’t get defensive about your copy. After all, there’s plenty more (or at least there should be plenty more) where that came from.

Who is your writing inspiration?

My own special odd couple: Dr. Seuss and David Ogilvy. Dr. Seuss twisted, shaped, deconstructed and invented language to create stories that were fun to read and listen to but also touched on some pretty serious subjects. SEO copywriters do the same thing to some extent. We have to come up with creative ways to write around sometimes awkward keywords without offending our readers. David Ogilvy, on the other hand, was the father of advertising as we know it. He worked with big-time clients and wrote many iconic headlines. I have a Divid Ogilvy quote hanging on my office wall to remind me that I am a copywriter first and an SEO copywriter second.

What are the biggest challenges faced by in-house SEO copywriters and how do you overcome, or work around, them?

In-house work brings with it a measure of security and daily routine that can be equal parts benefit and stumbling block. It’s easy to settle in and lose touch with the latest SEO developments. It’s important to keep yourself informed and to constantly hone your SEO copywriting edge. SEO has a short and rapidly evolving history. It’s easy to fall behind.

Is there anything you want to add that our copywriting readers should know?

We have seen some major changes from Google over the past few weeks: all queries switching to “not provided” and the hummingbird update. As with most shakeups from Google, a certain amount of uncertainty has surfaced in the blogosphere. I, however, don’t believe this is a time to panic. In fact, I think it’s a great time to be an SEO copywriter. More than ever, Google is making content king when it comes to search. We may not have the same metrics we’ve relied on for years, but the nature of SEO is the same. Sites need rich, engaging content that feeds the increasingly important knowledge graph. As SEO copywriters, we are the ones who will write this content and help drive the future of search.

About Richard Hostler

Richard Hostler writes engaging copy that generates sales. He is currently the SEO Copy Manager at Brookstone, where he connects online customers with the best gadgets and gifts. When he’s not writing, Richard can be found training for and racing triathlons around New England. You can follow him through his website, LinkedIn or twitter.

 

On SEO & guest blogging: A smart talk with Ann Smarty

SEO ninja Ann Smarty discusses SEO and guest bloggingToday we’re pleased to share our chat with Ann Smarty, founder of MyBlogGuest and veteran SEO and internet marketing expert.

Here Ann discusses how MyBlogGuest works, her current passion for reviving Threadwatch, and her take on guest blogging for links.

You’re well known as the founder of MyBlogGuest. Could you share a bit as to how it works for freelance writers and blog owners?

MyBlogGuest.com was started as a simple forum with the only aim to connect people with one interest: guest blogging. I never intended to monetize it. It was just a fun idea quickly wrapped together with no budget behind it.

What happened next was a fun time of building the community, collecting the feedback and implementing it. In an effort to cover development costs we had to monetize it but the gist remained the same: We wanted people to meet and build relationships

Currently our features include:

  • Articles Gallery: A writer can upload his/her original guest article there for blog owners to come, preview and suggest their site to be its home. I think it’s a good tool for any blogger: Whenever they have too little time, leave on vacation, get a new job, etc., the Articles Gallery can be their source to support the blog. The Articles Gallery is 100% free from any money offers: We want the blog owners to only use the content if they love it! There should be no other incentive.
  • Infographics Gallery: The similar tool for infographics designers to find blog homes for their work. Together with the infographics we require an original text description to go with it. (My case study is here).
  • Articles Requests: A blog owner can leave a “request” for some specific guest article topic and authors can pitch ideas. The unique part of this feature is that ALL articles here are pre-moderated, so the blog owner gets an essentially edited piece of original content based on his/her specific requirements and topic. (Here’s a quick video).
  • Verified authorship: We comply with Google trends and encourage authors to verify the authorship of their guest posts (and thus digitally sign them). Blog owners may visit that section of “verified” content and allow established authors to guest post.

#1 Authorship example:Ann Smarty

 

 

 

 

#2 Authorship example:Ann Smarty

 

 

 

 

 

 

There are lots of other features including link tracking (for authors to be able to use a guest post elsewhere if the blog, for example ceased to exist), free Copyscape checks (to make sure all content is original), 24/7 moderation and support (thanks to our awesome team), follow-up reminders, free hand-picked and monthly updated “featured” requests lists, etc.

We still can’t stress the value of relationships enough!

Even with PRO membership I have always been saying: Pay for a couple of months, build some contacts with a bunch of bloggers and move on! Don’t use it as your only or main source of guest post opportunities. Go out and reach out to more bloggers, use MBG-powered connections to expand to “friends of your friends” circles, etc.

Lately there’s been some concern expressed by SEOs regarding Google’s warning about guest blogging for links. What’s your take on all this? Should this be a concern?

My main concern is the SEO community – people are too distracted and confused. SEOs just keep looking in the wrong direction!

I’ve said this before: Guest blogging for links has always been doomed. It’s simply not the way it should be used to work!

Instead of picking up to Googler’s work and inventing “red flags”, SEOs just need to grow up and make it work the right way, i.e., build a linkable asset (tool, whitepaper, great article, etc) and use guest blogging and social media to get an initial attention to it.

If you are doing your job right, you won’t have to keep writing guest posts just for the sake of gaining links: Links will start coming on their own!

If that’s how you are guest blogging, you will always be good! :)

You’re also very involved with the Threadwatch community. What is Threadwatch about?

Threadwatch is one of the oldest SEO communities. It’s been around since 2004! Then it was inactive for a while and Jim Boykin decided to revive it in January of this year. I happen to be Internet Marketing Ninjas’ community manager, so I was the one to oversee and manage the revival.

In my revival submission, I covered all the Google updates and news we had missed.

Since the re-birth we have redesigned it and added a couple of innovative features. One of the recently added is the “Marketing Conferences” page which enables users to mark conferences as “I am going to” and it will then be reflected in the calendar (as well as your user profile and on the conference page as well). Basically, it’s like a community-driven personal conference manager.

We are still undergoing the “beta” phase though: Looking for the “core” active members and editors who will create the “ultimate” voice of the resource and define its actual style.

Time will show but I would love to see Threadwatch to be the major resource of what is important in SEO and social. I don’t want it to be yet another list of “top lists”, you know. I want it to be the ultimate hub of in-depth SEO discussions: “Less noise, more signal” :)

But time will show… The community is organic in nature; you can’t always control it, so we’ll see where it goes!

You’ve been in the SEO and internet marketing profession for a considerable time now. What is your overall impression of the state of the SEO industry today?

I stopped counting years in SEO, to be honest. I’ve been involved long enough to understand that nothing essentially changes: Google is trying (and often failing) to find really quality content and SEOs are trying to “fake” it instead of actually trying to *build* it.

In the process, Google is getting more aggressive and SEOs are getting more sophisticated (instead of putting the same amount of energy into actually *building* it). Luckily, the SEO community is slowly but surely growing up and it’s been awesome to be part of that process!

About Ann Smarty

Ann Smarty is founder of MyBlogGuest, Branding and community manager at Internet Marketing Ninjas, co-founder of ViralContentBuzz and regular contributor to a number of top marketing resources. You can follow Ann on Twitter (@annsmarty and/or @seosmarty) and on Google+.

photo thanks to chrishusein

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Social search? Author rank? Terry Van Horne has his word

Candid interview with SEO/search expert Terry Van HorneTerry Van Horne is widely known and esteemed by the SEO and search community for many reasons.

He is held in high regard for championing SEO and search industry standards as the veteran SEO professional that founded SEO Pros. He is recognized as the Director of the not-for-profit Organization of Search Engine Optimization Professionals (OSEOP). He is known for his work with David Harry at the SEO Training Dojo.

Terry is also distinguished by his colorful character, straightforward manner, sharp wit, and merciless honesty when offering his opinion on industry matters – and I’m delighted he has done so here!

In this interview, I ask Terry for his take on social search, Google’s authorship, and the related G+ attribution issue. (His choice words about the latest buzzword, “outbound marketing,” were entirely unsolicited.) :)

There’s been a lot of discussion about Google’s authorship and its future as a ranking signal. Where do you see this whole author tag thing going?

Author Rank is a gleam in every popular blogger’s eye. I don’t think it has a hope in hell of ever being a bigger ranking factor than it is now.

In other words, if someone is plugged into the mother ship they see their friends and those they follow. Beyond that, author tags are only suitable for use in a very limited way.

The day they make it a ranking algo is the day you start seeing author tags on e-commerce pages.

In our initial discussion, you had mentioned a glitchy issue with Google’s attribution loop. What needs to be corrected?

Glitchy? I bet those getting caught in the “glitch” have a more colorful word for it.

To some extent it is broken with too much mis-attribution. Spammers are now picking up and targeting sites that are vulnerable to mis-attribution.

Google is trying hard to complete the circle between G+ profiles and anywhere they are found, so if a site is not using the author tag they are vulnerable to someone commenting and including a link to a Google profile.

Another way is if an author links to a G+ post. To some extent Google is forcing the use of the tag by making those not using it a target for highjacking authorship.

There’s also a lot of buzz about “social signals” in search and “social SEO”… What’s your take?

Think about it. This is SEO 101! If it is not indexable, it can’t affect rank. Correlation is not causation!

Most of Twitter is not indexable! Large portions of Facebook – same deal. Even Google + is limited by the privacy settings.

David Harry and I were interviewing Joe Hall for our “Search Geeks Speak” around the time he was promoting a social search tool, and he shared with us that he was surprised how much data is hidden on Facebook by privacy and other impediments.

IMO, Social is about verifying other signals like links and general promotion with buzz and legitimate engagement. For instance, an increase in the velocity of link acquisition should be accompanied by increased “mentions” and other Social buzz.

We found the easiest way to move video up the rankings was to accompany it with social activity. It is even more important for press releases and other more temporal searches, such as for events.

What are your top 5 favorite sources of SEO & search information?

SEO Training Dojo and the SEO Pros Community, David Harry, Bill Slawski, Webmaster Help Desk and Google Search – the last of which is by far the most useful resource I have to learn about anything from SEO to programming or the phone number of Buzz Buzz pizza! The best pizza in Toronto!

I don’t read many blogs as I would rather filter info through the community I’m hanging in. I see what’s worth reading or worse, what people need to be protected from.

As a veteran SEO professional, what words of wisdom would you offer the new SEO copywriter?

Concentrate on writing good copy because good copywriting naturally uses primary and derivative keywords which make the copy more understandable/readable and RELEVANT – because in the end “Google does not buy anything! Their users do!!”

Please the users and you please “the Google”.

You are known as an advocate for SEO & search industry standards. Could you discuss your work at SEO Pros?

SEO Pros and the Ontario registered NFP (Not For Profit) OSEOP (Organization for Search Engine Optimization Professionals) have been around since 2003. We were the first organization for Search Engine Professionals.

At times we have participated in the discussion of SEO Standards, and have always had upholding standards a requirement for being included in the OSEOP directory.

Currently we are moving our focus from Standards (basically there are many ways to the same goal) to Risk Assessment, which is less of a moving target.

I’m also a big supporter in the belief it has to be an inclusive process. I like the ideals of the RFC (Request for Comments) process* where anybody can participate by just following the framework.

Any parting thoughts you’d like to share?

People say SEO has changed a lot. On page optimization is same as it ever was and well, quite frankly, I don’t see link building and lot of what others call SEO as actually being SEO!

IMO, it is internet marketing/promotion or the new buzz word that annoys the F…. outta me … outbound marketing.

There ya go boys’!  An F bomb – the reputation remains unsullied!

CYa@DaTop!

Tmeister

* Request for Comments is the process by which many Internet Specifications and Protocols evolve.

 

About Terry Van Horne

Terry Van Horne has been developing and marketing websites since the early 90’s in various marketing and development positions, including: working as internet marketing manager for one of Canada’s largest real estate developers; SEO for an award-winning real estate company; and as search engine and marketing manager for ecommerce stores in the apparel and musical instrument industries. In 2007, he developed a YouTube Marketing Strategy for WorldMusicSupply, and to date those 300+ videos have received over 26,000,000+ downloads.

He is currently a partner with David Harry in the award winning SEO Training Dojo, a learning community, as well as three other marketing and industry news sites. Terry founded SeoPros.org, an organization for consumer advocacy and search engine optimization professionals, and is currently a Director of the NFP organization OSEOP that grew out of it.

photo thanks to fdecomite

Learn the latest SEO copywriting best practices with SuccessWorks’ SEO Copywriting Certification training – the only online SEO certification program independently endorsed by SEO Pros!

 

 

2012’s top 10 SEO expert interviews

The number 10 representing our 10 best interviews with SEO experts from 2012For us, 2012 was a year enriched with conversations with some of the best and the brightest in the SEO and search industry. From Jonathan Allen of Search Engine Watch to Jill Whalen of High Rankings Advisor, Eric Enge of Stone Temple Consulting to Dana Lookadoo of Yo! Yo! SEO, our guests generously shared their stories, perspectives, and insights with us.

So here they are (in no particular order): our top 10 interviews with a line-up of illustrious SEO visionaries, experts, thought leaders, luminaries…and really great folks!

 

Photo of Nathan Safran, SEO expert from Conductor2013 will be the year of the SEO”: an interview with Nathan Safran

Can you feel it? Conductor’s Nathan Safran did when his research, in partnership with Search Engine Watch’s Jonathan Allen, predicted that “2013 will be the year of the SEO.” Why? You’ll have to find out for yourself! Nathan also has some truly interesting things to say about Google’s Panda and Penguin updates, and the SEO and search industry as a whole.

 

Photo of Jonathan Allen, SEO expert, Director of Search Engine WatchInterview with the Englishman in New York, SEW’s Jonathan Allen/Part 1

And speaking of Jonathan Allen…the head honcho of Search Engine Watch shares the story – in intimate detail – of his path to his current role in part 1 of our 2-part interview. Did you know he began as a student of literature and philosophy? Learn more about Jonathan’s intriguing journey into the center of the SEO and search industry in this first installment! (Includes his break-through video, 50 SEOs, 1 Question).

 

A second photo of Jonathan Allen, to accompany part 2 of his interviewInterview with SEW’s Jonathan Allen/Part 2: A Search Manifesto

An in-depth interview unto itself, in part 2 Jonathan shares his unique take on Google’s search, social, and clean-up initiatives (i.e., Search Plus Your World, Google+, and Panda/Penguin). He also describes where he sees the search industry going with his provocative, self-described “search manifesto.”

 

 

Photo of Jill Whalen, SEO expert and CEO of High RankingsJill Whalen on SEO: then & now

One of the first women pioneers of SEO (she discovered SEO before it was SEO), Jill Whalen of High Rankings shares her trail-blazing venture into the industry. Starting with her analytical curiosity dating “waaaaay back to the early 1990’s”, Jill was instrumental in forging the SEO and search industry – along with her reputation as a leading industry thought leader and practitioner. She also shares her insights into the primary factors influencing SEO, the importance (and rarity) of truly good copywriting, as well as the impacts of Google’s data encryption, over-optimization penalty, and Search Plus push on the SEO profession and search industry.

 

Photo of Eric Enge, SEO expert, Owner of Stone Temple ConsultingInterview with SEO expert & master interviewer, Eric Enge

Renowned SEO veteran Eric Enge of Stone Temple Consulting is recognized not only for his expertise, but also his skillful interviews with the likes of Matt Cutts and Danny Sullivan. Eric credits his interviewing technique for allowing him to predict both the Panda and Penguin updates. Besides generously sharing his insights into how he sees the SEO and search industry evolving in the near future, Eric indulges us with a prediction for a huge update that should happen any day now…hmmmmm

 

Photo of SEO expert Jennifer Evans Cario of Sugar Spun MarketingOn SEO, social media & small business: An interview with SugarSpun Marketing’s Jennifer Evans Cario

Among the “second wave” of women who followed in the footsteps of the original SEO pioneers, Jennifer Evans Cario of SugarSpun Marketing shares her self-taught foray into SEO and internet marketing. She also shares her passion and childhood inspiration for championing small business, as well as her reasons for migrating from SEO and search to blogging and social media marketing. Along with her personal sharing, Jennifer addresses the intersection of search and social with her “Pinocchio Effect” theory, and talks about the thought processes behind her (then upcoming) book, Pinterest Marketing: An Hour a Day.

 

Photo of C.C. Chapman, Co-Author of Content RulesC.C. Chapman on SEO, Search Plus, and doing the unexpected

The widely recognized co-author of Content Rules, C.C. Chapman had relatively humble beginnings as yet another corporate employee. In his interview, Chapman shares a “high-level view” of his path to becoming a writer, speaker, and consultant, and why he loves Google’s Search Plus. He also speaks to the role of SEO in content marketing, emphasizes the importance of “doing the unexpected” with your content, and discusses why indeed content is king.

 

Photo of Debra Mastaler, SEO Link-Building ExpertQueen of Link: Interview with Debra Mastaler

Think link building, and you think Debra Mastaler. Like Jill Whalen, Debra is one of the first wave of SEO women who helped build the industry. Here she shares her story of her SEO beginnings – honing her link-building skills working for Whalen – and her holistic marketing approach to her profession (in fact, she refers to link building as link marketing). Find out what Debra has to say about the changing (pre-Penguin) link landscape, Google’s preference for big brands, and the plethora of link-building opportunities that social media and blogging have brought.

 

Photo of Matt McGee, SEO and Search ExpertMatt McGee on SEO & small business search marketing

The talented journalist and Executive News Editor of Search Engine Land and sister site Marketing Land, Matt McGee also finds time to write his own daily blog, Small Business Search Engine Marketing. In this interview, Matt traces his rise through the SEO ranks, discusses why he chooses to focus on small business SEM, as well as what small business owners need to focus on in light of the Panda and Penguin updates.

 

 

Photo of SEO Expert Dana Lookadoo of Yo! Yo! SEOYo! Yo! SEO’s Dana Lookadoo on Re-branding and SEO+

In our interview with another force emerging from the “second wave” of women in SEO, Dana Lookadoo shares her path to her profession. She also talks about her re-branding to incorporate word-of-mouth marketing and social media sharing with Yo! Yo! SEO (hence SEO+). So if you were ever wondering how Dana arrived at that name, you’ll find out here! You’ll also find out about her passion for educating clients, her thoughts about the state of the SEO industry, and her words of advice for the new SEO copywriter.

 

Interviews and corresponding posts by Laura Crest, Blog Editor

 

photo thanks to woodleywonderworks

 

Would you like to pursue a career in SEO copywriting? Start with checking into the SEO Copywriting Certification training program to learn the latest industry tools, techniques, and best practices! 

From surviving to thriving: lessons from Sean McGinnis

Today we feature our interview with Sean McGinnis, a highly successful online marketer and trainer who started out his internet marketing career with a simple DVD movie review website in 1999.

Here, Sean shares his experience and the insights he has gleaned through his 14+ years in the internet marketing industry, from how he first started out with his online business to what he did to carve out his market niche in digital marketing training with his launch of 312 Digital.

A most informative and inspirational chat! Enjoy…and please feel free to ask Sean your own questions in the comments section below.

Please do tell: how did you start out in internet marketing?

I got my start in the industry the same way so many others have – I built my own web site. I launched DVD Verdict, a DVD movie review web site, in April 1999. Along the way, I learned a lot about HTML and web development.

Later, I sold websites to lawyers for a premier web development company focused on the law firm market. From 2006-2009, I managed the SEO team for that company.  My team consisted of 37 consultants. I served as CMO and General Manager of an internet bar exam test-prep business. Today, I’m VP of Sales & Marketing for a startup in the legal space that drives highly qualified traffic to law firm web sites.

You recently launched your business, 312 Digital, as a “hard-core, how-to digital marketing training business.” Could you elaborate on what 312 Digital is about?

312 Digital offers a wide range of digital marketing training classes. The classes are always conducted in-person and they are limited in size to encourage the best possible learning environment.

Many people attend a conference or webinar to try to learn the various disciplines that fall under digital marketing – or they just muddle through and learn on their own.

Most conferences don’t teach attendees how to perform digital marketing tasks. Instead, they focus on teaching strategy or worse yet, simply highlight keynote speakers.

Most webinars don’t teach anything, either. Instead, they exist to get people to hand over their contact information so businesses can follow up and sell them something else – a product or a service. Webinars are the perfect lead gen machine – but they very rarely teach very much.

312 Digital provides a rigorous, structured method for learning the ins and outs of digital marketing. We offer classes in Email Marketing, Content Marketing, Social Media, Video and much more.

What inspired you to create 312 Digital?

The “idea” of 312 Digital is really a coming together of a few different ideas. I really wanted to do more speaking, because speaking and teaching is something I really enjoy.

I also love to work closely with people I love and respect. Collaboration is, to me, one of the highest art forms of professionalism. I love to surround myself with people who are much smarter myself: Better writers; better speakers; amazing people.

I have a pretty robust network and was looking for a way to collaborate with the best and brightest. 312 Digital is a coming together of these two things – collaborating with really smart people and teaching people about digital marketing.

Could you share your insights into what’s involved in starting up an online marketing business?

I’m not sure we’re doing anything different than what you would do. We’ve created a tightly defined offering – one that lends itself to robust storytelling. We’ve identified a group of influencers and shared what we are doing with them in hopes that they would actively share our story with their networks.

We have focused quite a bit on potential off-line marketing channels, because our target market is not necessarily heavily involved on-line. A significant segment of the market still needs to learn these digital marketing skills. We’re targeting them.

So what makes 312 Digital training unique?

My main goal for 312 Digital is to be able to offer the best possible training for the money. One of the ways we do that is via a business model and a mission that keeps the focus on the training and on serving our students.

The best way to illustrate what I mean is to share with you a few guidelines we’ve developed as I thought through the business model.

  1. 312 Digital will NEVER accept sponsors at our events. Ever. I believe the very act of selling access to your paying customers is akin to pimping them out – a vile act that has no place in business.
  2. 312 Digital pays our speakers. This ensures there is an arms-length business relationship between 312 Digital and our speakers. This is the best possible way to ensure the content they provide is the best it can be. My time has value; so does your time; so does our students’ time. I value that time and pay accordingly.
  3. 312 Digital speakers receive every lead from every class. I will never take a consulting fee from one of our students. I will never take a finder’s fee or a cut of any work our speakers that generates from a 312 Digital class. Ever. This ensures I have the best interest of our speakers at heart, just as I do our students.

I know of no other provider who has stated operating principles like these. These are the cornerstones of what I would call “business integrity.” I believe we charge a fair price for an amazing day of learning. I don’t want that muddied or muddled by side deals and sponsorships. I want the focus on the classroom and the student.

Any words of wisdom you’d like to offer to the newer online copywriter or internet marketer?

My advice is this. Study hard. Work hard. Be a student of the game. Understand your customers. Understand the rules of the game. Understand who the judges are and what they want as an outcome.

My single most important advice is this – stop trying to find shortcuts to success. As marketers, it is endemic in us, and I cannot for the life of me understand why. If something is freely available, cheap and easy to execute it probably doesn’t work. If it does work, it won’t work for long.

 

More about Sean McGinnis

Sean McGinnis is founder of 312 Digital, a company that teaches marketers, consultants and small business owners how to market their business on the web via training classes focused on Digital Marketing, SEO, Social Media, Email Marketing, PPC, and more. Sean also brings his 14+ years of digital marketing experience on behalf of clients through regular consulting and speaking engagements. You can connect with Sean on Twitter and LinkedIn.

photo thanks to woodleywonderworks

 

Is your website not converting as it should? Or do you need a content marketing strategy for 2013? Check into my low-cost, high-value SEO Content Review service – I can diagnose (and treat) your web content blues and strategize an awesome content marketing plan for the new year!