Freelance writers: Here's your secret to landing great clients

Why not stand out from the  rest of the freelance writing crowd?

Why not stand out from the rest of the freelance writing crowd?

Want to know the secret to closing more deals and landing more clients?

It’s all in your pitch.

What do you say when you talk to prospects (or chat with them on the phone?)

Do you say something like, “I’m a freelance writer with over four years experience. I write B2B copy and I specialize in web pages and blog posts.”?

Or do you say, “I transform existing B2B content into top-positioned and high-converting copy. My clients typically see a 25-60% increase in leads after my rewrites. I can work with your team as an outsourced partner or develop the content strategy for you.”

See the difference? One version pops with beefy benefit statements while the other version just … fizzles.

Many freelance writers are experts at creating USPs (unique selling propositions) for their clients. They can easily pinpoint exactly what makes their clients cool and what sets them apart.

However, these same super-smart writers get stuck when it comes to their own USPs. This is a huge disconnect. After all, there are thousands of other writers out there. You want to focus on what makes you unique. What you bring to the table. What makes you so good.

What makes you the writing expert that the client should hire? Right now.

The secret to wowing prospects and converting them into clients is to have a refined, sharp and snappy USP.  You’ve created them for your clients. Now it’s time to create one for yourself. A really good one.

Want to stand out? Here are some things to think about:

1. What past successes have you had? How have you increased your past clients’ conversion rates?

2. What specialized training do you have? Can you offer a service (such as copy testing) that other writers don’t offer?

3. Who is your target customer? What are their pain points and how can you help them go away?

4. What makes you different than all the other writers out there. Hint: It’s not “excellent customer service” or “attention to details.” All writers can and will say that. Think outside the box.

5.  Do you have a deep expertise in a certain subject matter? This is a big deal, especially in regulated industries.

6.  Do you package your services in a way that would be beneficial to your customers?

Feeling stuck? Ask another writer to help. Chances are she/he can pick your brain and develop a brilliant USP statement for you.

(And yes, you still need a USP, even if you’re brand new to the business. You may not be able to break out the beefy benefits yet, but you can certainly come up with something.)

Try tweaking your USP and see how it resonates with your prospects. Chances are, you’ll soon be closing more deals and making more money.

It’s all in the pitch. :)

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The SEO content writers' manifesto

SEO Writers' ManifestoI am more than “just a writer.”

I am a profit driver. A matchmaker. A storyteller.

A content marketing dream-fulfiller.

My SEO writing helps companies reach more people, do more good and make more money.

It doesn’t matter if I’m writing about industrial machinery, hotels or software.

Or if I’m blogging, tweeting or writing sales pages.

I entice my readers. I entertain them. And I empower them to make a buying decision.

I know that I have a responsibility to learn more, write more, research more.

The more I learn, the more my writing can touch one more person. Drive one more sale. Do more good.

Sitting on my laurels and refusing to expand my knowledge goes against everything I am.

I take classes. I read books. I study and network with other writers.

Sometimes, I’m even a copywriting rebel – because “following the rules” may not make sense 100% of the time.

I’m not afraid of Google.

I embrace new social networks, new algorithmic updates and new online opportunities.

Because I know I can master anything new that’s thrown my way.

And I know good writing never goes out of style.

I know my writing ability is a gift and I treat it like the precious thing it is.

I charge accordingly for my time, set good boundaries and work when I’m fresh.

When I feel burned out or blasé, I know taking a break will restore my focus and heighten my abilities.

This helps me write commanding SEO content that stands out, gets shared and boosts conversion rates.

I take care of myself physically and mentally.

And my writing inspires people to take action, calms peoples’ fears and gives them hope.

That’s pretty powerful.

Over the years, I will drive thousands (maybe millions) in profit for my clients.

I will change lives.

I will provide hope.

I will succeed.

I am an SEO content writer.

And I love what I do.

UPDATE: My designer, Erin Kistner, transformed this post into a beautiful graphic. Please feel free to share it. :) I’ll also have a downloadable PDF soon!

SEO Writers' Manifesto

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Freelance writers: Are you making this costly mistake?

Wow. This freelance writer is really frustrated. Been there. Done that.

You answer emails within five minutes of them hitting your inbox.

You race to pick up the phone by the third ring, no matter what you’re doing (or writing.)

A client emails you Saturday night at 10:45 and you immediately return their note. Even if that means taking time away from your family.

And you’re always exhausted and wondering how you can work an 11-hour day with nothing to show for it.

Sound familiar? If so, quit it! You’re hurting your productivity by being so available (and hurting your business, too.)

Here’s why:

If you don’t value your time, why should your client?

Have you ever experienced the Friday “drop and go?” This is when a client emails you late on a Friday and writes, “I’m heading out for the weekend, but I need this first thing on Monday.

Ouch.  Suddenly, you realize that your weekend plans are now on hold until you can get the client stuff squared away.

No fun.

I’ve gone through this before. I actually had a prospect demand a proposal on Christmas Eve (really!). Did I do it? Yes. And the client didn’t look at the proposal until mid-January. Yeah. I learned my lesson.

The truth is, we train our clients how to treat us. If we’re always available and accommodating, it’s not the client’s fault for thinking we could handle a weekend project. Or a rush job. Or we’d drop everything so we could complete “just this one thing.”

That’s why setting client boundaries is so important. Yes, be available within reason. And yes, there may be those times when you do work a weekend to take care of a good client. But it shouldn’t be an expectation.

Being overly available kills your productivity

“I can’t get everything done” is a common freelance writer frustration. If this is a frustration of yours, here’s a reality check:

If you’re bouncing from email to client project to phone calls, you’ll never have enough time. It will take you ten times longer to finish a fast project. You’re doing it to yourself – even if it feels like it’s being done to you. You’re multitasking yourself into an unproductive frenzy. 

So here’s what to do about it:

1. Train yourself to NOT respond every time you hear the phone ring or your email ding. Turn off the ringer. Mute the notifications. Close the door. Do everything you can to give yourself some uninterrupted work time. It’s OK. People will leave a message. You can call/email them back.

2. Tell your clients when you are available.  Most clients don’t require (or expect) an instant response. They just want to know that you’ll get back to them within a reasonable amount of time. It’s even OK to write, “I received this and I’ll look into it later today,” so they know you’re on it.

3. Practice saying, “I’m happy to do this. There will be a rush fee of X.” It’s amazing how clients will suddenly value your time much more when they know there’s an extra cost involved. :) Plus, if you do work a rush job, you know you’ll be well compensated for your time.

Try implementing these strategies. I guarantee you’ll feel more centered, energetic and focused during the day. Plus, you’ll probably see a nice productivity spike – which could mean more money in your pocket. Bonus!

What do you do to keep yourself on track? Please leave a comment with your favorite boundary-setting strategies!

Special sale – save 20% on the SEO Copywriting Certification training with coupon code HAPPY 2014. Get started today!

Go jump in the ocean! Better yet, take a flying leap!

Jumping in the ocean on New Year's DayIt’s my first post of 2014. I can’t believe we are a week into the year already. Let me wish you a belated happy New Year!

Now that we got that out the way, let me tell you to go take a flying leap!

Don’t take that the wrong way, I’m not telling you off; I’m offering inspiration.

Clean the slate

2013 wasn’t the best year for me (although it definitely had some good highlights). Just a few low moments included:

  • Breaking my nose
  • Ending my 10-year marriage
  • Having to dramatically cut my business to part-time and get a 9-to-5 job
  • Putting on a bunch of the weight I had previously took off (and kept off for several years)

I highlighted other not-so-great moments and some positive outlooks in my Not another thankful post, if you were curious.

Needless to say, I was ready to move on from 2013 and wanted to embrace 2014. I felt as though I was digging myself out of hole and needed to just give myself a new starting point.

I saw 2014 as that new starting point.

A little less talk and a lot more action

In my last post of 2013, I discussed setting goals instead of making resolutions. A couple of years ago, Heather outlined the same strategy, but got more in depth with how to apply this to your content marketing goals.

So once you set your goals, how do you flip the switch? Is having the goal enough to change your behaviors? Not always.

Sometimes you need to conquer your fears in order to make the next move.

Make it dramatic, if you have to

Some people can just make a decision then take action. Other people need to be guided through the process (read: dragged into change). And still other people just need something to spark the change.

I like that spark – even if it is symbolic.

SkydivingSeveral years ago, when my life needed a shakeup, I jumped out of an airplane. That year, I quit a job that I hated and started my freelance copywriting business. It was freeing and wonderful. Jumping out of the plane was the symbolic change I needed.

To kick off 2014, I jumped into the ocean (dove in head first) on New Year’s Day. It was my way to wash off all that I didn’t want from 2013, so I could start 2014 clean.

Things didn’t magically change with diving in that ocean, but I had the spark I needed. In less than a week from jumping in the ocean, I ran a 5k (I haven’t been running in months!) and I joined a gym (with a gym partner to keep me motivated).

Where’s your spark?

What’s it going to take to get you moving? What can you do that will get you motivated and excited to take that first crucial step? Whatever it is – whether it is symbolic or a concrete step (like renting an office space) – go for it.

Make 2014 your year to shine! Happy New Year!

Start the new year off right with 20% off of the SEO Copywriting Certification training. Just use coupon code HAPPY2014. Hurry though – offer ends January 20!

Not another thankful post!

Glass is half fullYes, it’s that time of year again. Thanksgiving (in the United States) is coming and the posts about being thankful are all around.

It’s not just blog posts. Since November 1st, Facebook has been filled with people listing something they are thankful for each day of the month.

I have yet to write what I am thankful for and I was really resisting writing one of these posts.

That being said, I have to write this post. Let me explain.

That glass is half empty

This year has not been very kind to me.

About one week after I turned 41, I broke my nose playing softball. I took it in stride and figured that breaking my nose was going to be the worst thing that happened to me this year.

Yeah, I was wrong.

Not to be a Debbie Downer, but here are some of the not-so-great things that happened this year:

  • My 10-year marriage (12-year relationship) ended, ironically right before DOMA was overturned.
  • My copywriting business went from full-time to part-time because I needed to supplement my income with a 9-to-5 job.
  • My father-in-law lost his battle with cancer.
  • My mother ended up in the ICU after she turned blue in the ambulance on the way to the hospital.
  • A friend was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer.

That’s quite the list, isn’t it?

Let’s see that half-full glass

It would be easy to focus on all of that (and the other negative events that didn’t get included), but then I would just be miserable.

Instead, I need to find the silver linings … the bright spots of the year. After looking at that list, you might think that I have little to be thankful for. It’s not true.

So let me tell you just some of the things I am thankful for this year:

  • My mom is out of the hospital and is on the road to recovery.
  • I am going to spend Thanksgiving with my family (including my mom). Because I live on the opposite coast, I haven’t seen them since anything on the above list occurred.
  • The end of my marriage was very hard, but it was amicable. Truth be told, we ended the marriage so we could stay friends.
  • My ex-wife (well, we’re not divorced yet, but we’re in the process) and I have made the transition from wives to best friends. There were a few bumps, but overall it was pretty easy and quick.
  • I am rediscovering who I am and learned that I am able to stand on my own.
  • I surprised myself and have started dating someone special. She makes me very happy.
  • Two of my best friends welcomed twins into their lives … and these two babies are adorable (and healthy)!
  • These changes in my life – especially the switch in my business – allow me to take a step back and assess what I want to do with my business and my life.
  • The view from my new apartment is wonderful!
  • I was reminded that I have some wonderful and supportive people in my life who have helped me through this transition. (Including Heather – thank you!)

What the heck does this have to do with copywriting?

So, is this just another “I’m so grateful” post that is all about my journey? Not entirely.

There are lessons you can learn from my year.

Life is not always easy. Running your own copywriting business can be difficult. Heck, being an in-house writer has its bumps.

It is how you handle these bumps that will help you.

Too often it can be easy to only focus on what is going wrong. When this happens, you run the risk of getting caught in a cycle. Soon, you only focus on the negative issues and you find yourself in a vicious cycle. If you don’t let yourself find the silver linings – trust me they are there if you look – you will not be able to break free of the negativity and you will become stagnant.

You will find yourself hating your job or your business and you will lose your muse.

In this week of Thanksgiving, your job is to step back and take a few minutes to list the positives in your business and your life. What are you thankful for? It doesn’t have to be anything momentous – what makes your day a little brighter?

Make a list of what you are thankful for and keep it by your computer.

As the days go by, if you find yourself stuck in a negative funk, take out the list and remind yourself of the positives in your business.

Have a wonderful week everyone and Happy Thanksgiving!

PS – I wrote this post before I read Heather’s wonderful post Yes, failure is an option! Her post really struck a chord with me – the first two items on my “half-empty” list could easily fit into the failure category. Thankfully life has taught me how to grow stronger from adversity. If you haven’t read the post, read it now.


Photo credit: © Photographer: Duncan Noakes | Agency:

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Why you can’t fly solo as a freelance copywriter

Even superman can't run a freelance copywriting business aloneAre you a freelance copywriter? Do you consider yourself a solepreneur? Are you the only one working on your projects?

Knock it off!

You’re not Superman (or Superwoman).

Yes, you may be the only official employee in your business, but that doesn’t mean that you need to go at it alone. In fact, you shouldn’t try to be a one-woman (or man) show.

You don’t know everything

Sometimes it is hard to admit, but you don’t know everything. There are many legal aspects to owning your own business and, unless you have a business degree, you should consult with an attorney or other legal expert when dealing with the business side of freelance copywriting.

Also, you will need to have a contract for each copywriting gig – yes, even the “quickie” jobs. A copywriting contract protects you and your client, and is a must.

When it comes to tasks like accounting or administrative work, you most likely have the necessary skills to complete these tasks, but are they worth your time? You may find that you save money by paying someone else. Use your time for projects that allow you to charge your higher hourly rate.

Mistakes happen

When it comes to writing, you may be an expert, but you are fallible. Sometimes you are too close to your writing to see errors. Typos and creative spelling could slip by your spell check, but will catch the attention of your client or your readers.

How can you fix that? Find someone you trust to edit (or at least read through) your content before you send it to a client or post it to your website. It could save you headaches … and your reputation.

Who is keeping you motivated?

When you work for yourself, you might lose your focus or motivation – especially when you have to write for yourself. Keep yourself going strong with the help of an accountabilabuddy.

You can also find support and feedback from your colleagues. Be sure to network and to join in the conversations on virtual groups – like the SEO Copywriting LinkedIn group.

Your job this week is to examine your business and see where you can enlist help.

Do you go at it alone or do you get help? Share what works for your business.

Photo by J F Willis (Flickr: Up Up and away) via Wikimedia Commons

Speaking of not flying solo, let Heather help you with your B2B or B2C content strategy. She has a few client spots open, so check out her direct response SEO copywriting services today!

Go Niche or Go Home! Today’s success path for freelance SEO copywriters

Focus on one niche for a success freelance SEO copywriting business.

Focus on one niche for a success freelance SEO copywriting business.

If you want to grow your SEO copywriting business in a MAJOR way — whether you’re brand new to SEO copywriting or you’ve been doing it for a while but you’re at a career crossroads — you’ll want to take the niche path.

This is the top recommendation of industry experts now, because the cluttered field of skilled and not-so-skilled SEO copywriters is making it harder for you to stand out and attract new clients. This approach has worked gangbusters for me since 2010.

So what does it mean to take the niche path?

It means choosing one industry or market you’ll “own.” For instance, you can claim your position in a particular field, such as the craft beer SEO copywriter, the green/eco products SEO copywriter, the wedding SEO copywriter, the accounting firm SEO copywriter and so forth.

Then you can position yourself in your specific niche industry by writing a helpful website, blog posts and other content that includes the keywords your prospects will use in searches: [industry] copywriter, [industry] marketing, [industry] SEO, [industry] web content, etc.

Once you stake your claim in a specific industry, magical things will happen.

First, you’ll be a superstar in a specific market that needs you instead of being “lumped” among dozens or even hundreds of professional SEO copywriters. Clients in your niche market will be THRILLED to find a skilled SEO copywriter who understands their business, prospects and language.

Next, potential clients will find you quickly in Google and other search engines. Picture how a potential client searches for a skilled SEO copywriter in their industry: they’ll type in “industry SEO copywriter,” right? If you’re well positioned in that industry — with a nicely optimized website and blog posts — you’ll do well in Google, Bing and other search results.

In addition, you can quickly build a reputation as the industry’s go-to SEO copywriter. Once you set up your niche position in Google+ (and link your content to your Google+ profile), your blog posts and articles will give you credibility as a smart and trusted resource. Of course, you need to make sure all your content is offering helpful SEO and marketing tips for your niche industry.

That’s just for starters. You can also build a solid reputation and business foundation by writing articles for your niche trade association, partnering with niche web developers and finding other ways to immerse yourself in that industry. You’ll soon find that clients are calling you for help!

Wondering how to find a thriving, profitable niche market for you? Try these clues from my AWAI articles as well as Copyblogger and Nick Usborne.

About the Author

Pam Foster on finding your SEO copywriting nichePam Foster is a senior content writer and web consultant who has worked in marketing communications for more than 30 years, with 13 of those years entirely devoted to the veterinary and pet industry. She has coached numerous veterinary practices, manufacturers and pet companies on how to make the most of their online marketing efforts. Her specialties include local marketing, web content, SEO, blogging and social media. She’s been a frequent speaker/teacher at industry events such as the NAVC Conference, BlogPaws and the LifeLearn webinar series. She has worked for IDEXX Laboratories, The Pet Health Network, DirectVet Marketing, LifeLearn, numerous practices and other small veterinary and pet businesses. Her mission is to help her clients thrive online.

Top photo thanks to Daniel Zedda (Darwin)

Time’s running out on Heather’s Copywriting Business Bootcamp! Learn how to make more money, faster. Save 10% until 11/13/13 with coupon code SECRETS.

Feeling the burn and seeking some balance



“Feel the burn!” If you hear this when you are working out, it is a good thing.

However, I have been feeling a different kind of burn lately. I’ve been:

  • Burning the candle at both ends.
  • Getting burned out.

I realized that I am about to crash and burn … and that’s not good.

Over the last six months, my life has gone through many ups and downs. Most recently, I shifted my copywriting business to an off-hours endeavor and started a 9-to-5 job (well 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.) – mostly for financial security.

I chose a job outside of my field because I didn’t want to use all of my creative juices during the day and have nothing left for my own clients.

The good news: I’m not using all of my creativity during the day.

The bad news: I’m still burning myself out.

My new job has a rather long learning curve (which drives me crazy), and I’m still trying to hone my productivity so I can continue to meet my clients’ needs in the shortened amount of time that I have.

Of course, all of the pending projects that I had are now suddenly active.

Trying to survive a crazy schedule

On most weekdays, I leave my apartment by 8am (sometimes having done some work on my laptop before leaving); go to my day job; leave a little after 5 p.m.; drive to my office (maybe grab something to eat); and work for several more hours – many times until midnight or later.

I am trying to find balance, but right now that includes scheduling a social outing some nights … then coming home to work on my laptop. In the month that I have had my new job, I have come directly home from my day job maybe one time.

Overcome the online writing overwhelm monster

The other day I was preparing for a meeting with a prospective client, and I realized that I was going to crash and burn. By adding to my already overloaded workload, I was doing a disservice to my clients and myself. It was difficult, but I had to make the decision that I cannot take on new clients at this time.

My focus right now is taking care of the projects I already have and making sure my long-term clients are happy. And, I need to make sure I set up some real self-care foundations so I can overcome the overwhelm monster.

Are you setting boundaries?

You may not be working two jobs (or you might be), but most likely there are areas in your life where you are becoming a bit overwhelmed.

Are you taking on too many projects at work?

Do you have trouble saying “no” professionally and/or personally and take on more than you can handle?

Are you working from home while you try to run the household?

Don’t sabotage yourself.

I have already made the decision to not take new clients at this time, but I also have another goal for my schedule. I want to feel the burn again – in a good way. I am going to carve out a spot in my schedule for exercise. It makes me feel better and helps me focus.

Determine what is holding you back and find a way to change it. Even minor changes can make a big difference! Take some time this week to examine your life and find a place to make a positive change.

How to successfully launch your own freelance SEO copywriting business

Five posts on launching your own freelance copywriting business is featuredA couple months ago, I gathered a collection of Heather’s posts about surviving in the highly competitive SEO freelance copywriting business.

Today, I’ve selected a complementary set of Heather’s posts on how to start your own freelance business – beginning at the beginning.

These posts are a mashup of both video how-to’s and Heather’s regular Thursday posts. For those of you (like me, like Heather) who prefer to read content, rest assured that the video posts included are all accompanied by narrative text.

So without further prefacing, let’s get on with Heather’s best on how to successfully start and manage freelance copywriting business…


Plan for SuccessLaunching your freelance copywriting business: plan for success!

Preceded by how to: define a niche market, ask for a writing deposit, deal with writing revisions, stand firm by your rates, protect yourself with a contract (no matter the size of the gig), and hone in on the services to offer your clients, in this video post Heather gets down to the nitty-gritty of how to launch your freelance copywriting business – by making a smart plan.



Dive or Wade in?Should you dive or wade into a freelance copywriting business?

Wondering whether to just take the plunge in starting your new freelance copywriting business? Or would it be a better strategy to slowly wade in? In this final installment of her How to start an SEO copywriting business video posts, Heather outlines the pros and cons of each approach.




31 Questions for your client31 questions to ask your new copywriting client

Asking questions is the best way to get at the answers you need to write highly effective, targeted SEO content. Meaning, content that resonates with your clients’ prospects and succeeds with conversions. Think your list of 10 questions is a bit much? Try 31 – from reporting to marketing to process/procedure questions – to drill down to the details you need to generate great conversions-driving SEO copy that best helps your new client.


Sales Call Success7 tips for sales call success

So this is it: you’ve the questions you need to ask (above) and have scheduled a call with your perfect prospect. No worries: with these seven business-savvy tips from Heather (backed by her five confidence-boosting tips to help your prepare for prospect calls) you will close the deal. Easily.





How to raise your ratesHow to raise your freelance copywriting rates

Now that you’ve some momentum in your freelance copywriting business, and have (hopefully) accumulated some case studies and killer testimonials, you’re ready to ask for a raise. This can be a very uncomfortable and somewhat scary thing to do. Here, Heather outlines six things to consider if you’re thinking about raising your freelance copywriting rates.


photo thanks to Steven Depolo

Learn all you need to know about starting your own freelance copywriting business from 12 of the world’s leading experts! Check out the 6-week intensive SEO Copywriting Bootcamp today



















Handling your copywriting client’s feedback: 5 do’s & don’ts

Dealing with client feedback can be difficult, but you can minimize the painYou’ve done your homework. You’ve interviewed your client. You’ve painstakingly put together the first draft for some new web copy. And then comes the waiting game.

Sometimes you get feedback right away. Sometimes it takes a few days or even weeks. But when that email or copy review call comes around, it’s a critical moment in your relationship with your client and your reputation as a copywriter.

If you want to keep clients happy and maintain your integrity as a writer, you have to strike a balance. Here’s how.

1. Do research thoroughly.

You can avoid a lot of problems with feedback and reduce the rounds of edits by doing as much research as possible up front. Using a standard copywriting questionnaire for the start of each project can help, but be sure to review and reach out to the client if there are any misunderstandings.

Case in point, I received a questionnaire back from a client once and at first glance, everything looked okay. It wasn’t until later when I was working on the web copy that I realized they’d skipped several questions on their target audience. Without this, it was difficult for me to frame their benefits in the right light. Fortunately, there was still plenty of time in my project timeline to have a short call about their audience.

2. Don’t let the client squeeze out more rounds of edits.

The reason for having a questionnaire and documented process from the start is so the client knows what to expect during the project. Two rounds of edits and a final proofreading is the standard clause in all of our engagement letters, and you may want to adopt the same policy.  This way the clients know this from the start, and understand that anything above and beyond these two rounds of edits will be priced at a separate rate.

3. Do be respectful and listen to their feedback.

As difficult as it may be, the client is allowed to come back and say “This sucks.” You have the option of pushing back (see below), but if you handle this moment wrong, you could lose your reputation and possibly future work from this client.

If the client says that they don’t like it, get specific detailed feedback on which areas are not working for them. The first round of edits is going to be more intensive, so expect that. If they aren’t, push for feedback. It’s better to get it during the first round of edits then be hit with lots of feedback later on in the process that undoes all of your hard work.

4. Don’t be afraid to push back on specific portions of the copy.

Even though you should be respectful and listen (or read) feedback, don’t be afraid to push back on some of the edits if they aren’t making sense. Sometimes clients may have a big difference of opinion on what their web copy should say. In my experience, it’s normally of a matter of them wanting to focus on what they do (the features) instead of what they can do for clients (the benefits).

This is where your detailed web copy questionnaire can come in handy again. You can refer back to it and explain that your choices in writing were based on the information they provided: their target audience, their position in the market, their competitors. If this information is incomplete, you need to ask them to fill in the gaps for the next round of copy but stand by what you wrote based on the information provided.

5. Do develop a gut feeling for your style of great copy.

The biggest lesson I’ve learned as a web copywriter is that there are some things I am great at writing about and there are others that I really suck at. No matter how hard I’ve tried to write web copy for life coaches – it ends up being terrible. Those clients were never happy, and neither was I.

Don’t be afraid to turn down a project or refer it out to someone else if it doesn’t feel right. When you develop a good gut feeling for your own writing style and capabilities, you reduce the criticism of your work. You can take a look at a writing opportunity and instantly know whether or not you’ll be able to deliver your best.

What are your do’s and don’ts for the feedback part of the process? How have you learned to develop a thicker skin?

About the Author ~ Courtney Ramirez

Courtney Ramirez is the Director of Content Marketing Strategy for Endurance Marketing. She’s an SEO Copywriter and content marketing specialist who creates clickable content for clients in both B2B and B2C markets. As a proud graduate of SuccessWork’s SEO Copywriting Certification training program, she geeks out on algorithm updates and content marketing metrics. She’s always in the mood for a good cat-based meme. You can connect with Courtney on Google PlusLinkedIn or Twitter.

photo thanks to Rodger McCutcheon (Auckland Photo News)

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